Literature of American Cultures

Reading & Composition

Expository writing based on analysis of selected masterpieces of ancient and modern literature. R1B satisfies the second half of the Reading and Composition requirement.

Prerequisities/Placement:

1A or equivalent is prerequisite to 1B.

See the Schedule of Classes to obtain the class number for your desired section.

Reading & Composition

Expository writing based on analysis of selected masterpieces of ancient and modern literature. R1A satisfies the first half of the Reading and Composition requirement.

Prerequisities/Placement:

UC Entry Level Writing Requirement or UC Analytical Writing Placement Exam.

See the Schedule of Classes to obtain the class number for your desired section.

Reading & Composition

Whereas the influence of Italian-Neorealism on world cinema is undeniable, the literary origins of Neo-Realism are less well-known. The notion of Neo-Realism was in fact first used in Italy to describe trends world literature, and the development of a specifically Italian Ne0-Realist style emerged from a close collaboration between the writers and filmmakers of this period.  Just as Italian Neo-Realist cinema became a cultural phenomenon in China in the 1950s, the Italian literature that Chinese readers were consuming was also dominated by Neo-Realist writers.

Reading & Composition

In this course, we will examine found documents as a literary device, i.e., stories that are told through an accumulation of texts, often “found” and assembled by the author or narrator.  Our readings will include examples of epistolary literature as well as experimental tales told through pieces of poetry, critical reviews, footnotes, and gallery labels.  We will also consider horror writers’ particular fondness for found documents, and cases when the mysterious sources of certain materials — and the gaps between texts — represent encounters with the unknown.  Many of our texts will feel r

Reading & Composition

This course approaches the North and Central American landscapes as cultural and geographical spaces that are crisscrossed with borders, both seen and unseen. Focusing on Latinx border crossings and the U.S.-Mexico border(lands), we’ll explore a tangle of themes and questions: How do borders function as physical and ideological boundaries that construct and reinforce difference, prompting us to view the Americas in terms like insiders vs. outsiders, citizens vs. immigrants, here vs. there, place vs. non-place, or humans vs. migrants, laborers, or refugees?

Reading & Composition

Do you need to be at least a little crazy to be a great writer? Is going insane just a natural reaction to the world around us? To what extent should mental health crises be medicalized, and to what extent should they be accommodated as uncomfortable parts of most people's life experiences? These are just some of the questions that we will explore together over the course of the semester.
 

Reading & Composition

Writing strategies and expectations vary among cultures. English writers, for instance, may discover that their concise and clear expression can sound naïve to Spanish ears, or that their use of irony and witticisms can be taken as a sign of levity. Conversely, Spanish writers may find that their thoughtful attempts at emphasizing an idea are seen by English readers as unnecessary repetitions, or that a general reflection, intended to highlight the argument’s complexity, is felt instead as a digression.

Reading & Composition

“Tell me, how does it feel with my teeth in your heart?”

  • Medea, Euripides

“There’s always a part in every [episode] where the narrator goes, And that’s when she snapped.”

Reading & Composition

In this course, we will examine found documents as a literary device, i.e., stories that are told through an accumulation of texts, often “found” and assembled by the author or narrator.  Our readings will include examples of epistolary literature as well as experimental tales told through pieces of poetry, critical reviews, footnotes, and gallery labels.  We will also consider horror writers’ particular fondness for found documents, and cases when the mysterious sources of certain materials — and the gaps between texts — represent encounters with the unknown.  Many of our texts will feel r

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