Reading and Composition (R&C)

R1A.001: Violent Humors: Invective, Farce, Satire, Parody

17206
T. Hausdoerffer & K. Nielsen
MWF 9-10:00
243 Dwinelle

In this course we will consider some of the more pointed, or critical, forms of humor in literature, including invective, farce, satire, and irony. Focusing mainly on the genres of comic drama and picaresque fiction, we will examine how different authors make use of such humors.   » read more »

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R1A.002: Making Sense

17209
L. Gurton-Wachter & D. Simon
MWF 9-10:00
215 Dwinelle

What does it mean to “make sense” of a literary text? Does meaning lie beneath the surface of the text, waiting to be discovered? Or does each reading produce meaning differently?   » read more »

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R1A.003: Society and the Madman

S. Roberts
MWF 10-11:00
222 Wheeler

“If she’s mad, so much the better, let everyone be mad like her.”  (M. Duras, 1976)

What does it mean to be “mad”? or “not mad”?  Who decides and to what ends?  Is it necessarily always desirable to be considered “sane”?   This course will explore answers to questions such as these by looking at the various ways in which madness has been represented in French, English, and American texts by different authors, at different times, and across different genres (the novel, the short story, theatre, and film).

Required Texts:

The Random House Handbook, Frederick Crews

The Yellow Wallpaper, Charlotte Perkins Gilman

Madame Bovary, Gustave Flaubert

Hamlet, William Shakespeare

Rhinoceros and Other Plays, Eugène Ionesco

Pelléas and Mélisande, Maurice Maeterlinck

Nausea, Jean-Paul Sartre

Films (to be screened in class):

Ma vie en rose, Alain Berliner

I Heart Huckabees, David O. Russell

Course Catalog Number: 17212

R1A.004: Literature, Race, and Psychoanalysis

A. Henry

MWF 9-10:00

222 Wheeler

In this reading and writing seminar we will revisit the questions “what is reading?” and “what is interpretation?” in relation both to the problematics raised by psychoanalytic literary theory and to the complexities within debates of race relations.   » read more »

Course Catalog Number: 17215

R1A.005: PRESENTING THE DEAD: Ghosts in Literature and Photography

17218
A. Goldstein
MWF 11-12:00
223 Wheeler

We mortals are always telling stories about the dead.  This course will investigate a rich and strange collection of textual ghosts as they embody life and death questions for art:  the relation of the past (personal and historical) to the present; the potential and limits of the attempt, through writing or picture-taking, to make present what is irretrievably gone; the function and stakes of stories that challenge the rules of official reality.  » read more »

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R1A.007: Loyalty and Betrayal

17224
L. Rubman
T/Th 8-9:30
125 Dwinelle

Are loyalty and betrayal mutually exclusive?  To what and to whom do we owe fidelity and how and why do we pervert it?   » read more »

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R1A.008: Women and War

17227
A. Bruckel
T/TH 9:30-11:00
123 Dwinelle

In this course we will try to define women’s voices in war, both in male and  female authors from various places and eras.  The texts we will read range from a Greek epic of the eighth century B.C. to Shakespearean drama, to European and North African twentieth century texts written by women in response to violent conflicts such as the First World War and the Algerian War (1954-62).  » read more »

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R1B.001: The Deceit Conceit

17233
L. Gold & O. Sanjideh
T/Th 8-9:30
219 Dwinelle

The Strunk and White dictum to “omit needless words” will guide our work on writing.  Students interested in crafting streamlined, energetic prose and prepared to rewrite may find this class especially congenial. » read more »

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R1B.002: The Politics of Style

17236
J. H. Cruz
T/TH 9:30-11:00
222 Wheeler

Rhetorical and literary traditions have for a long time sustained the distinction between content and form, meaning and style, logos and lexis, res and verba. Of course, this distinction also implies a valuation of the terms that tends to favor the former over the latter. In this class, we will take special care to counter this trend by examining the ways in which form and style are not only implicated in the meaning of the texts (thereby questioning the rigidity of the distinction between form and content) but also how the form and style (often seen as superfluous or extra) carry with them their own histories and politics that add further dimensions to the meaning of a text beyond its mere content.

We will begin with a classical form, the epic, and consider how the Aeneid was used by the ancient Romans as a political tool to justify their notion of empire. We will then move on to various other genres and periods concluding in the present with texts whose form and content can be understood to represent more oppositional politics.

Required Texts:

Virgil, The Aeneid

Jorge Luis Borges, Selected stories

Julio Cortázar, Selected stories

Catalina De Erauso, Lieutenant Nun

William Faulkner, The Sound and The Fury

Jamaica Kincaid, Lucy

Herman Melville, Benito Cereno

Tomás Rivera, …And the Earth Did Not Devour Him

Juan Rulfo, Pedro Páramo

Strunk and White, The Elements of Style

Course Reader containing secondary material and excerpts from other texts

Films:

Pedro Almodóvar, Mala Educación/Bad Education

John Cameron Mitchell, Hedwig and the Angry Inch

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R1B.003: Moors, Monsters, Giants, Witches and Women: the body, violence, and marginality in literature and film

17239
S. Triplette
T/TH 2-3:30
121 Wheeler

“Every self defines itself by engaging an Other, some one or thing that is both attractive and repulsive, similar and different.  On a larger scale, whole social groups define themselves through the same dialectical process.” –Timothy S. Jones and David Sprunger

Marvels, Monsters and Miracles: studies in the medieval and early modern imaginations.

The above definition of “otherness,” or alterity, appears in a volume on monsters.   » read more »

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R1B.004: The Art of Stasis

17242
C. Sumner
MWF 9-10:00
242 Dwinelle

This class will focus on literary texts which use various representational strategies to depict scenes of personal and social stasis.  With each text, we will return to a central question: how does this author represent stasis?  And related questions we will often ask are, what are the consequences for the notion of development in the play, poem, novel, story, etc?  Does this particular piece of literature resolve any of the problems it raises?  If not, how does the author craft the work so that we still derive a sense of satisfaction from it?  We will begin with Hamlet and end with The Stranger.  There will also be a small visual component to the course, consisting of a section on Cubist painting, a film, and, if time permits, some television shows.

Required Texts:

Shakespeare, Hamlet

Melville, Bartleby

Forster, Howard’s End

Hemingway, The Sun Also Rises

Camus, The Stranger

Ishiguro, Remains of the Day

There will also be a reader consisting of poetry by T.S. Eliot, Pound, Stevens, and Sassoon, and short stories by Tolstoy, Henry James, and Hemingway.

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R1B.005: The Deceit Conceit

17245
L. Gold  & K. Spira
T/Th 12:30-2:00
20 Wheeler

The Strunk and White dictum to “omit needless words” will guide our work on writing.  Students interested in crafting streamlined, energetic prose and prepared to rewrite may find this class especially congenial. Along with prose composition, students will also receive instruction and practice in researching topics in the humanities.  » read more »

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R1B.006: Poverty

17248
A. Moore and T. Mc Enaney
MWF 9-10:00
123 Wheeler

Who are the poor?  In this course, we will examine literary and visual representations of poverty in several cultures and eras.  As we move between poetry, photographs, film and prose, we will examine how authors treat this question and others, such as, What are the roots of poverty?  » read more »

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R1B.007: The History of Trauma; The Trauma of History

Instructor: Karina Palau

17251
S. Popkin & R. Palau
T/TH 9:30-11:00
20 Wheeler

Trauma, in its essence, is paradoxical.  On the one hand, it yearns to be inscribed, even broadcast; on the other, it often stubbornly refuses inscription.  This course will examine how literature has grappled with this paradox of trauma.   » read more »

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R1B.008: Literary Games

17254
D. Inciarte
MWF 12-1:00
223 Wheeler

Horace famously wrote that our stories should aim to instruct and delight. Countless authors have followed his advice, with a variety of interpretations, of course. We will look at a number of texts that offer the reader a particular form of pleasure and delight: literary playfulness. All works of literature consist of language games but some are more self-consciously structured as linguistically playful objects than others.  How do our authors play with language? How do they play with their readers? Are their playful creations simply fancy mind games, akin to chess, or are they serious philosophical inquiries that, in the words of Mary Poppins (paraphrasing, among others, 16th century Ludovico Ariosto) add a spoonful of sugar to make the medicine go down?

Students will improve their analytical reading and expository writing skills through close reading, theoretical and contextual discussions, and critical research. Requirements will include a four-page diagnostic essay; short free-writing assignments; writing workshops; short critical presentations; regular postings for online discussion; and two progressively longer essays, each of which will be revised.

Please buy the editions specifically ordered for this class. All books should be available at the ASUC Textbook Store or at Ned’s across the street on Bancroft. The writing workbook, titled Learning to Write in Comparative Literature 1A and 1B, is available as a course reader at University Copy on Channing Way.

Course Reading

Denis Diderot, Jacques the Fatalist

Plato, The Symposium

Thomas Bernhard, Old Masters

Vladimir Nabokov, Pale Fire

Cees Nooteboom, Rituals

Italo Calvino, The Castle of Crossed Destinies

Julio Cortázar, selected short stories

Jorge Luis Borges, selected short stories

Silvina Ocampo, selected short stories

Selection of literary theory

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R1B.009: Women and Vampires

17257
T. Singleton
MWF 1-2:00
222 Wheeler

Anne Rice, Anita Blake, Vampire Hunter, A Vampire Huntress Legend and Buffy the Vampire Slayer. If there is a genre lead by women writers, it is the vampire genre. Not only do women make up the best selling writers of vampire literature, they also make the best selling heroines of the literature.   » read more »

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R1B.010: Nostalgic Fictions: The Odyssey and Modern Literature

17260
T. Hausdoerffer & N. Cleaver
MWF 8-9:00
182 Dwinelle

In this course we will consider the idea and experience of nostalgia as it is manifested in works ranging from ancient epic to modern fiction, drama, and film. Since the term “nostalgia” is derived from the ancient Greek word nostos, meaning “return” or “homecoming,” we will devote the first part of the semester to a study of the most influential story of return ever composed, the Greek epic poem the Odyssey.   » read more »

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R1B.011: Impersonations

17263
J. Hill
T/TH 8-9:30
223 Wheeler

In this course we will ask two questions in particular: What is a person? and What does it mean to pretend to be someone else?  » read more »

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R1B.012: Life is a Dream: Literature, Adventure, and Human Destiny

17266
J. Chang-Augst
MWF 9-10:00
130 Wheeler

Adventure – narrative, poetic, dramatic, and filmic – is the guiding thread in this inquisitive journey. Following the monkey king of A Journey to the West to the Beatniks of Kerouac, we will travel through realistic, fantastic, and surreal realms, led by heroes and heroines who are not only human, but also immortal or, at times, half man, half beast; for the wisdom they have to impart and the discoveries they have to offer. The timeless search for meaning engages us with questions which transcend national boundaries such as technology, time and the human condition. But we also confront events that arise from cultural and economic differences: war, oppression, and genocide. In a world where all seems at times too familiar, we nonetheless continue to grapple with the teleology of human destiny.

Reading List

C.E. Wu (trans. Yu) Journey to the West

Calderon Life is a Dream

Stendhal The Red and the Black

Brecht Mother Courage and Her Children

Kerouac On the Road

Coetzee Waiting for the Barbarians

Arendt The Human Condition (selections)

Heidegger The Question Concerning Technology

Steiner Language and Silence (selections)

Stiegler Technology and Time (selections)

Films

Cocteau Orphee

Marker La Jetee

Godard Contempt

Course Catalog Number:

R1B.013: Life is a Dream: Literature, Adventure, and Human Destiny

17269
J. Chang-Augst
T/Th 8-9:30
225 Wheeler

Adventure – narrative, poetic, dramatic, and filmic – is the guiding thread in this inquisitive journey. Following the monkey king of A Journey to the West to the Beatniks of Kerouac, we will travel through realistic, fantastic, and surreal realms, led by heroes and heroines who are not only human, but also immortal or, at times, half man, half beast; for the wisdom they have to impart and the discoveries they have to offer. The timeless search for meaning engages us with questions which transcend national boundaries such as technology, time and the human condition. But we also confront events that arise from cultural and economic differences: war, oppression, and genocide. In a world where all seems at times too familiar, we nonetheless continue to grapple with the teleology of human destiny.

Reading List

C.E. Wu (trans. Yu) Journey to the West

Calderon Life is a Dream

Stendhal The Red and the Black

Brecht Mother Courage and Her Children

Kerouac On the Road

Coetzee Waiting for the Barbarians

Arendt The Human Condition (selections)

Heidegger The Question Concerning Technology

Steiner Language and Silence (selections)

Stiegler Technology and Time (selections)

Films

Cocteau Orphee

Marker La Jetee

Godard Contempt

Course Catalog Number:

R1B.014: Poetics of Emancipation

17272
M. Bhaumik
MWF 10-11:00
123 Dwinelle

What is freedom?  This course examines how philosophers, social movements, artists and writers from different historical contexts attempt to wrestle with this seemingly self-evident question.  » read more »

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R1B.015: Meta-stories

17275
M. Fisher
T/TH 9:30-11:00
223 Wheeler

“What’s the use of stories that aren’t even true?” Haroun asks his father the storyteller in Salman Rushdie’s Haroun and the Sea of Stories.   » read more »

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Undergraduate

41C: Introduction to Literary Forms: Forms of the Novel

The City and the Novel

17287
A. Dwyer
T/TH 9:30-11:00
121 Wheeler

As has been often noted, the rise of the modern metropolis and the ascendancy of the novel go hand in hand.  But what is the nature of their relationship? Does the novel merely “represent” the city? Or do novels and other urban texts actually shape the metropolis and our experience of it?

We will read five novels about four cities, starting with Balzac and the age of Realism in France and ending with Döblin’s “modern epic” Berlin Alexanderplatz In between we will trace the “myth of St. Petersburg” from Alexander Pushkin to Andrei Bely via Gogol and Dostoevsky.  We will also read Mrs. Dalloway, Virginia Woolf’s masterpiece set in post-war London. Alongside each novel we will read a number of shorter literary and non-literary texts. Two Weimar films will accompany Döblin’s cinematic novel.

As we consider the broad question of the relationship between urban life and novelistic form, a number of related questions will enter our field of vision: Is the city a setting? An actor? A language? A myth? What kinds of plots do cities engender and why? Why does crime play such a large role in the urban novel? What kinds of exchange (of money, people, words, texts) go on? How does gender work? How do these novels represent social, ethnic, and linguistic difference? What should we make of the intertextual relationships that exist between these city texts? How do these novels define, critique, and embrace modernity?

The Novels:

*Honoré de Balzac, Old Goriot (1834)

*Fyodor Dostoevsky, Crime and Punishment (1865-66)

*Andrei Bely, Petersburg (1916 and 1922)

*Virginia Woolf, Mrs. Dalloway (1925)

*Alfred Döblin, Berlin Alexanderplatz (1928)

Course Catalog Number:

41A: Introduction to Literary Forms: Forms of the Epic

The Arts of Epic

17290
S. Green
MWF 10-11:00
121 Wheeler

In “The Arts of Epic” we shall study the purposeful crafting and re-crafting of stories from ancient tragedy into epic and finally into epic’s derivatives (and mockeries) for the literary founding of cultural narratives, moral and ethical frameworks, and personal, artistic fame.  We shall pay particular attention to techniques of allusion, paraphrase, representation, and re-contextualization within literary recollection and invention.  Throughout the course we shall study examples of the visual and performing arts inspired by epic to consider the virtues and limitations of non-literary aesthetic forms in conveying epic’s weighty themes.

Course requirements: Daily readings, participation in class discussion, three essays, a midterm, and a final examination.

Readings

Euripides, Iphigenia in Aulis (Trans. Nicholas Rudall)

Aeschylus, Agamemnon (Trans. Alan Shapiro and Peter Burian)

Homer, The Iliad  (Trans. Richmond Lattimore)

Lessing, Gotthold Ephraim, Laocoön (selections; trans. Edward Allen McCormick)

Homer, The Odyssey (Trans. Robert Fitzgerald)

Virgil, The Aeneid (selections; trans. Robert Fitzgerald)

Dante, Inferno (selections; trans. Robert Durling)

Song of Roland (Trans. Frederick Goldin)

Ariosto, Orlando Furioso (Trans. Guido Waldman)

Music, Film, and Art

Graham, Martha, Clytemnestra (ballet)

Hall, Peter, dir.  Agamemnon (film)

Gluck, Christoph Willibald, Iphigenie en Aulide (opera)

David, Jacques-Louis, Paris and Helen and The Anger of Achilles

Laocöon (sculpture)

Petersen, Wolfgang, Troy (film)

Manuscript illuminations of Inferno

Fragonard’s drawings of Orlando Furioso

de Berchem, Jacquet, La Favola di Orlando (madrigals)

Handel, Alcina (opera)

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60AC: Topics in the Literature of American Cultures

Various Histories of Various Californias

J. Caballero
Tu 5-6 Th 5-7
205 Dwinelle
Screenings Tu 7pm

While making no claim to proportional representation or thoroughness, this class tries to survey some of California’s literary and artistic output that directly addresses the intense hybridity of California’s history.  Looking at writing in various genres and media, this class will try to make the concept of California as unstable as those of race, ethnicity, and community.  » read more »

Course Catalog Number: 17293

100: Introduction to Comparative Literature

Narrative and Social Life

Instructor: Kathleen McCarthy

17299
Prof. K. McCarthy
T/TH 9:30-11:00
221 Wheeler

This course will connect the structures of narrative with the structures of social life in two ways: we will examine the ways that social practices (such as marriage or class hierarchies) intersect with and shape the literary forms of narration; we will also examine the relationship between the language of social life (e.g. letter-writing, conversation, self-description) and the language of literary narrative.  » read more »

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100: Introduction to Comparative Literature

Infernal Texts

17302
S. Herbold
T/Th 12:30-2:00
234 Dwinelle

How and why do literary texts designate themselves as coming from hell? We will investigate the question of what comparative literature is through the lens of texts that set out to contest the social and literary norms within which literature must constitute its meanings.   » read more »

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112A: Modern Greek

M/W/F 12:00-01:00 222 Wheeler Instructor: Maria Kotzamanidou

17305
M. Kotzamanidou
MWF 12-1:00
222 Wheeler

Modern Greek is unique among languages in that it is the only modern language directly descended from Ancient Greek. In this course, the student studies reading, writing, pronunciation and use of contemporary spoken idiom, all within the historical and cultural context of the language. By the end of the course, the student should have a strong grammatical and linguistic foundation in Greek as it is spoken today. (No Prerequisite)

Course Catalog Number: 17305

154: Eighteenth- and 19th-Century Literature

Literature of the Americas: Melville and Sarmiento

Instructor: Francine Masiello

17308
Prof. F. Masiello
T/Th 11-12:30
222 Wheeler

This course is designed to explore foundational narratives of the Americas in the 19th century by focusing on the writings of Melville and Sarmiento. We will look at the ways in which these great masters of prose imagined the conflicts of the emerging liberal republic and the contradictions that they encountered as mid-nineteenth modernity came upon them.  » read more »

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155/French 141: The Modern Period

International Influences of and on French Existentialist Writing

17311
Prof. M. Lucey
T/TH 3:30-5:00
100 Wheeler
Please note this class is also listed as French 141

We will be interested in a number of the philosophical and political questions certain French existentialist writers (Sartre and Beauvoir) set out to confront in their novels (in particular, those having to do with race, sexuality, and colonialism).   We will also be interested in some of the international networks in which their writing came to be caught up as a result.  » read more »

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155/Slavic 134N: Senior Seminar in Comparative Literature

Aesthetes, Decadents and Symbolists: Europe's Fin de Siècle

Instructor: Harsha Ram

79931
Prof. H. Ram
T/Th 3:30-5:00
243 Dwinelle
Also listed as Slavic 134N

Please note: This course is sponsored by Slavic Studies but can be used to satisfy Comp. Lit major requirements. Please refer to explanation at the end of the description for more information.

The end of the nineteenth century in Europe saw the emergence of an international tendency in literature and art loosely called “decadence” or “symbolism.”   » read more »

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170: Special Topics in Comparative Literature

Absolutes and Relatives: Ethics and Morality in the Fictional Works of Nikos Kazantzakis

Instructor: Maria Kotzamanidou

17314
M. Kotzamanidou
F 2-5:00
125 Dwinelle

Nikos Kazantzakis was influenced, like so many other writers of his Modernist generation, by several moral and ethical trends of thought. The author himself, in his semi-fictional autobiography Report to Greco, acknowledges the influence of Bergson and Nietzsche and at the same time, he expresses his admiration for Buddha, Christ, Lenin, etc. This course focuses on the fictional works of Nikos Kazantzakis and it examines how this writer handles issues of ethical and moral relativism and absolutism in his works of the imagination. The tension between the absolute and the relative, in the moral and ethical thematic elements of his novels, emerges even more clearly as the author attempts to create characters that appear both as moral and ethical archetypes and at the same time as idiosyncratic individuals of an unambiguously unique, human nature. This often-irresolute tension between absolute and relative, in the moral and ethical content of Kazantzakis’ novels, has also given rise to a variety of critical approaches and has allowed for a greater freedom in the interpretation of his fiction. In fact, as Peter Bien has observed, the adaptations for the screen of three of his novels, by three different directors, under the titles “Celui qui doit mourir,”  “Zorba the Greek” and “The Last temptation of Christ,” change the ending of the novels and /or the ultimate focus, in each film, in order to express the director’s own vision and resolve some of the irresolute moral and ethical tensions that exist in this author’s works.

Texts: The novels of Kazantzakis in Greek. Because Kazantzakis’ language is extremely rich and full of neologisms, English translations are provided for the purpose of discussing the interpretations and renditions into English.

Theory and Criticism: In English

Films: In English and in French with English subtitles.

Course Catalog Number:

190: Senior Seminar in Comparative Literature

Lolita

Instructor: Eric Naiman

17323
Prof. E. Naiman
MWF 10-11:00
203 Wheeler

“Lolita, light of my life, fire of my loins.  My sin, my soul.  Lo-lee-ta: the tip of the tongue taking a trip of three steps down the palate to tap, at three, on the teeth.  Lo.  Lee.  Ta”

This seminar will be devoted to a careful reading of Nabokov’s most famous novel.  » read more »

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Graduate

201: Proseminar

Instructor: Eric Naiman

17358
Prof. E. Naiman
Fri 12-1:00
4104 Dwinelle

This course is designed to give all new graduate students a broad view of the department’s faculty, the courses they teach, and their fields of research.  In addition, it will introduce students to some practical aspects of the graduate career, issues that pertain to specific fields of research, and questions currently being debated across the profession. The readings for the course will consist of copies of materials by the department’s faculty.

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202B: Approaches to Genre: Lyric Poetry

The Medieval Lyric

17359
Prof. S. Lerer
Mon 3-6:00
104 Dwinelle

This course surveys the forms, traditions, and environments of lyric poetry in the European Middle Ages. It will read closely in examples from Latin and the vernacular languages, but it also hopes to ask some broader theoretical and cultural questions about the nature of genre, the material culture of medieval literacy, and the possibilities for literary criticism of past objects of aesthetic value. The course hopes to be responsive to student interest and expertise, but at the very least it hopes to survey in some detail the Middle English lyric, the the work of the Troubadours and Trouveres, the Minnesang, and the ongoing production of Latin verse, from the Carolngian period to the fifteenth century. In addition to exploring these literary traditions, we will examine ways of writing about them in the work of current literary critics. Finally, I hope to call attention to the manuscript environments of medieval lyric poetry: the anthologies that transmitted the poetry; the multi-lingual culture of medieval England; and the ways in which certain long poems (e.g., Chaucer’s Troilus and Criseyde) were read, copied, and reworked as assemblies of lyric expression. Students will be expected to read widely in the assigned texts and criticism; each student will be expected to deliver a brief oral report during a seminar meeting (in essence, open up the class discussion on a given topic); and each student will be required to write a final research paper keyed to the texts, themes, and concerns of the course.

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212: Studies in Medieval Literature

The Medieval Book: Editing Texts from Medieval Manuscripts

17361
Prof. J. Duggan
F 2-5:00
Seminar Room, Bancroft Library, 2121 Allston Way

An introduction to the theory and practice of editing medieval manuscripts written between the eleventh and the sixteenth century.  The primary material will be manuscripts housed in the Bancroft Library, although projects using microfilm and facsimiles of manuscripts found elsewhere may be undertaken.  » read more »

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232: Studies in Near Eastern-Western Literary Relations

Modern Readings of Job and the Enigma of Disaster

17364
Prof. I. Pardes
T/Th 5-7:00
4104 Dwinelle
Please note this class will meet for the first six weeks of the semester only.

The Book of Job has held a central role in defining the project of modernity from the age of Enlightenment until today. What makes the Book of Job such a prominent text in modern literature and thought?  » read more »

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240: Studies in the Relations Between Literature and the Other Arts

Photography's Other Histories

17366
Prof. J. Bajorek
Th 2-5:00
7415 Dwinelle
This course is also listed as Rhetoric 240G:5

Photography’s history has typically been told from the vantage point of Europe, with its double invention joining the Burgundy countryside (Joseph Nicéphore Niépce) to an English abbey (William Henry Fox Talbot) and occasionally Alexandria or China (when allowance is made for pre-photographic technologies).   » read more »

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256: The Craft of Critical Writing

How to Write a Book

17367
Prof. V. Kahn
Th 2-5:00
123 Dwinelle

This is a writing seminar for advanced graduate students. Preference will be given to students in their third and fourth years. Maximum enrollment: 14. Please review enrollment instructions.

Where do great ideas come from?   » read more »

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