Reading and Composition (R&C)

R1A.001: Transformations

17203
A. Moore
TT 9:30-11
223 WHEELER

In this course we will take a comparative approach to examine various representations of transformation across several historical periods, literary genres and films.   » read more »

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R1A.001: Reason and Passion

M/W/F 09:00-10:00 220 Dwinelle Instructor: Jonathan Rowan

17206
S. GREEN &  Rowan
MWF 9-10
220 WHEELER

In this class, as we read and discuss together works of various genres and periods (from the Roman epic to the nineteenth-century novel), we will examine the ways in which reason and passion, two powerful forces within the human psyche, are central to the authors’ concerns in their exploration of such topics as political rule; ethics; creativity; violence; self-mastery; and the relationships between self and family, the lover and the beloved, and the individual and society.   » read more »

Course Catalog Number: 17206

R1A.002: Lethal Passions

17209
CUDAHY & M. Kay
MWF 10-11
205 DWINELLE

Death, by murder, illness or suicide is the end result in many of literature’s most compelling stories of romantic love. From the topos of the fallen woman that permeates the 19th century novel, to the performances of awesome vengeance in Hedda Gabler and Medea, women heroines often take the brunt of society’s censure of “inappropriate” passion.   » read more »

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R1A.003: Philosophies of Love

17212
TREAT
TT 12:30-2
233 DWINELLE

This course is about love’s many dimensions, and especially about same-sex desire. We start by examining the Greek concept of love through Plato’s Symposium, then we will discuss Shakespeare’s Sonnets, addressed to two lovers — one young, male, and fair, the other an older, dark female.   » read more »

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R1A.004: Welcome to the Land of Oz

17215
B. Tran
TT 8-9:30
222 WHEELER

This course looks at the “unreal” in a number of literary texts, with specific attention given to the fairy tale and the theme of metamorphosis. » read more »

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R1A.005: Finding Things Out

17218
I. Perciali &  J. DeAngelis
TT 12:30-2
200 WHEELER

Identifying a murderer, discovering a secret, diagnosing a type, detecting a motive – many literary plots are built on the process of finding something out. Even the basic operation of describing the world and telling a story involves discovering and then communicating new knowledge.  But how exactly do we find out what we find out when we read literature?   » read more »

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R1A.006: Border Crossings

Instructor: Paul Haacke

17221
CHATTERJI & P. Haacke
TT 12:30-2
221 WHEELER

What does it mean to cross a border? What if a border is not just a mark of difference but also space of habitation? What happens when borders are displaced? In this course we look at various works that represent movement between different kinds of cultural and imaginary experience. Our readings will lead us to consider borders both as spatial boundaries and as boundaries in the self in order to ask questions about gender, homelands, nation, memory and language.

This course is designed to fulfill the University’s 1A reading and composition requirement. We will spend considerable time in class on improving students’ basic writing skills such as sentence and paragraph structure and thesis development. Students will write a number of short essays of increasing length from 2 to 6 pages during the course of the semester.

The course discussions will be derived from the following works:

Ovid, Metamorphosis

Shakespeare, Othello

Edgar Allen Poe, Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym

Tayeb Salah, Season of Migration to the North

Amitav Ghosh, Shadow Lines

Poetry: Charles Baudelaire, Fleurs du mal; Gloria Anzaldua, Borderlands/La Frontera; Elizabeth Bishop, “Geographies”

Film: Welles, Touch of Evil

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R1A.008: Travel and Identity

17227
H. Cruz
TT 11-12:30
223 WHEELER

A person’s concept of self, according to many theories, is formed through the encounter with others. Along these lines, the trope of travel in literature is usually associated with the development of some sense of identity for the character undergoing the travel. In this course, we will look at texts from a wide range of time periods where travel is an integral part of the main character(s)’ process of identity formation.   » read more »

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R1A.009: Rebel Children, Rebel Parents

17230
DILLON
TT 8-9:30
125 DWINELLE

While classic films like Rebel Without a Cause may have made defiance of patriarchal structures by children famous, recent films like American Beauty have looked at the comical shirking of parental responsibility and the consequent breakdown of the family structure.  » read more »

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R1B.001: Lethal Passions

17233
M. CUDAHY
MWF 9-10
205 DWINELLE

Death, by murder, illness or suicide is the end result in many of literature’s most compelling stories of romantic love. From the topos of the fallen woman that permeates the 19th century novel, to the performances of awesome vengeance in Hedda Gabler and Medea, women heroines often take the brunt of society’s censure of “inappropriate” passion.   » read more »

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R1B.002: Confessions… True or Otherwise

17236
BROWN
TT 9:30-11
262 DWINELLE

A confession is a serious thing. A signed confession of guilt makes for powerful evidence in a court of law. Some churches urge their members to confess regularly. Modern psychiatry encourages patients to recall and describe their past experience – an exercise in first-person narration that could be compared to a confession.   » read more »

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R1B.003: Soil

17239
D. Larsen
MWF 11-12
205 DWINELLE

The most tangible figure for any inhabited place is its soil. In this class we will investigate the deployment of soil as both symbol and material fact in various texts and traditions, along with the commonly associated practices and concepts of agriculture, property, nationhood and belonging. » read more »

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R1B.004: Modernist Subjectivity

17242
ZOU
TT 8-9:30
123 DWINELLE

This course will examine the diverse modes of modernist subjectivity in poetry. We will look into Western modernist conception of the self, its relationship to cosmopolitan landscape, to new ideas of history and language, and compare Western modernism with the concept of modernity in 20th century Chinese poetry. » read more »

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R1B.007: Down the Rabbit Hole

17251
P. SPRINGER
TT 9:30-11
220 WHEELER

Course readings focus on physical, psychological, and artistic voyages of discovery. Works read in the course describe a wide range of journeys, with outcomes ranging from the transcendent to just plain scary. » read more »

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R1B.009: Border Crossings

17257
CHATTERJI
TT 11-12:30
224 WHEELER

What does it mean to cross a border? What if a border is not just a mark of difference but also space of habitation? What happens when borders are displaced? In this course we look at various works that represent movement between different kinds of cultural and imaginary experience.   » read more »

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R1B.010: Romantic Nations

17260
MANALO &  Wellman
MWF 9-10
121 Wheeler

This course considers the relationship of literature and philosophy to the experience of nationality–and the extent to which this relationship can be understood under the problematic of “Romanticism.”   » read more »

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R1B.011: Exile, Subjugation and the Return

17262
J. Ramey
MWF 11-12
221 WHEELER

To lose something is one of the fundamental experiences of human existence-but just so is the experience of regaining something that was lost. This course will explore the intimate connection between the shock of exile and the creation of literary and cinematic masterpieces in different periods and political and cultural contexts.   » read more »

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R1B.012: Exile, Displacement, and the Literary Imagination

17263
P. Dimova
MWF 11-12
20 WHEELER

It has been said that with the unprecedented upheavals of the 20th century, exile and displacement have become the norm, rather than the exception, of the human condition. But at the same time, exile occupies an ages-old place in the literary consciousness, as reflected in works as ancient as the Hebrew Bible and classical Chinese poetry.   » read more »

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R1B.013: Love Stories

17264
D. COPENHAFER
MWF 12-1
130 Wheeler

It has been said that with the unprecedented upheavals of the 20th century, exile and displacement have become the norm, rather than the exception, of the human condition. But at the same time, exile occupies an ages-old place in the literary consciousness, as reflected in works as ancient as the Hebrew Bible and classical Chinese poetry.   » read more »

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